WITHQUIZ

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QUESTION PAPER

November 14th 2018

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The Question voted as 'Question of the Week' is highlighted in the question paper below and can be reached by clicking 'QotW below

WithQuiz League paper  14/11/18

Set by: The Stockport League (John Palmer)

QotW: R1Q9

Average Aggregate Score:   76.5

(Season's Ave. Agg. to-date: 76.5)

A fairly low aggregate for this format of paper but perhaps the most intriguing feature was the wide range of aggregate scores from the various matches - from 98 points to 56!

The questions provided plenty of material to get stuck into. 

 

ROUND 1Stockport style - Verbal

1.

Ahmed Sékou Touré was the first President of which African country when it gained its independence in 1958?

2.

Who was the architect of the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, which is popularly known as 'Paddy’s Wigwam'?

3.

The name of which element (atomic number 48) derives its name from the founder of the city of Thebes in Greek mythology?

4.

In 1978 Dan White shot and killed George Moscone, the Mayor of San Francisco, and which member of the Board of Supervisors?

5.

Who played the black detective John Shaft in the 1971 film Shaft?

6.

In Italian cuisine what are arancini?

7.

The Rugby Union Championship club Cornish Pirates adopted that name in 2005 – what was the former name of the club?

8.

Bjarne Soustrop created and developed which widely used computer programming language?

9.

Who designed the statue of Emmeline Pankhurst which will be placed in St Peter’s Square on 14th December?

10.

Marty Balin, Paul Kantner and Jorma Kaukonen were among the original members of which group?

11.

Which newspaper ceased publication in 1964 and was relaunched as The Sun?

12.

The National Trust properties Kingston Lacy and Max Gate are located in which county?

13.

The classical musicians Stephen Isserlis, Paul Tortelier and Yo Yo Ma are associated with which instrument?

14.

Who wrote the books Laidlaw and The Papers of Tony Veitch set in Glasgow in the 1970s – he is regarded as the 'Father of Tartan Noir'?

15.

The battles of Agrigentum (in 262BC) and Lake Trasimene (in 217BC) were battles in which wars?

16.

Léopold Sédar Senghor was the first President of which African country when it gained its independence in 1960?

17.

James Gosling, Mike Sheridan and Patrick Naughton created which widely used computer programming language?

18.

Who is the designer of the Peterloo Memorial which will be placed outside the Manchester Central Convention Centre next year to mark the 200th anniversary of the massacre?

19.

What was the pen name of Christopher Murray Grieve, Scottish poet, journalist, essayist and political figure, best known for his works written in 'synthetic Scots', a literary version of the Scots language?

20.

Which newspaper was closed in 1971 and merged with the Daily Mail?

21.

In Italian cuisine if a dish contains the word 'spiedini' how is it cooked?

22.

The classical musicians Victoria Mullova, Jascha Heifetz and David Oistrakh are associated with which instrument?

23.

Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir and Phil Lesh were among the original members of which group?

24.

The Rugby Union Championship club now known as Yorkshire Carnegie came in to existence in 1991 as Leeds RFC following the merger of which two clubs?

25.

Baddsley Clinton & Packwood House are National Trust properties in which county?

26.

Who played the detective John Klute in the 1971 film Klute?

27.

Who was Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988 and is currently the senior Senator from California?

28.

Which element (atomic number 41) derives it name from the daughter of Tantalus in Greek Mythology?

29.

Who was the architect of the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral which was completed in 1962?

30.

The Battle of Aegospotami in 405 BC was the last major battle in which war?

Sp.

What is the name of the BBC channel that broadcasts mainly in Gaelic?

Go to Round 1 questions with answers

ROUND 2 - Stockport style - Written

1.

What was the name of the Essex village used in a commercial for Republican candidate Dr Nick Stella in the 2018 mid-term elections to show the danger of not voting for Donald Trump?

2.

Which 1990s TV series had characters called Dale Cooper, Harry S Truman, Audrey Horne and Leland Palmer?

3.

Who wrote the poem which contains the lines "The tumult and the shouting dies; The Captains and the Kings depart"?

4.

What is the name of the largest dock on Merseyside?

5.

To what genus do the kingfishers belong?

6.

Who is the lead singer of the band Hawkwind and the only original member left? 

7.

Who was called, by Homer, the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs"?

8.

Who was the Transport Minister and MP for Wallasey, who oversaw the introduction of parking meters and the provisional driving licence in 1958, and panda crossings in 1962?  He fled to Monaco in 1975 to avoid a substantial tax bill.  He is buried in Southern Cemetery, Manchester.

9.

Which book by Jung Chang won the NCR Book Prize in 1992?  Its sub-title is Three Daughters of China.

10.

What is the capital of the Indian state of Rajasthan?

Sp.

What is the name of a series of routes in the Longstone Edge in the Peak District National Park suitable for horse-riding and mountain-biking?  It takes its name from an 18th century highwayman who was hanged on the Gallows Tree at Wardlow Mires.

Go to Round 2 questions with answers

ROUND 3 - WithQuiz style - Hidden theme

1.

The tune Gresford is more commonly known as what?

2.

The tune Crimond is usually used for setting the words of what?

3.

What was the title of Manhattan Transfer’s only UK Singles Chart No 1 hit in 1977?

4.

What was the title of Steely Dan’s fourth studio album released in 1975?

5.

Who is the landlady of 28 Barbary Lane in Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City novels?

6.

What is the title of Walter J Miller Jr’s novel, first published in 1959, which is set in a Catholic monastery in the desert of the south western United States after a devastating nuclear war?  It won the Hugo for Best Science Fiction novel in 1961.

7.

What word links a Marvel comics supervillain, a Greek nymph, and Lord Kitchener?

8.

Which John Keats poem starts with the words “Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of silence and slow time”?

Sp

Who was King of Romania at the outbreak of World War I?  (name and regnal number required)

Go to Round 3 questions with answers

ROUND 4 - WithQuiz style - Identify these Sporting Duallists

1.

Winner of the 1912 Olympic decathlon and pentathlon gold medals, he was later (in 1913) stripped of the titles for having played semi-professional baseball in 1909 and 1910.  He went on to play baseball for the New York Giants and American football in the NFL between 1920 and 1928

2.

At Syracuse University he was an All-American at lacrosse.  He the played in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns between 1957 and 1965.  He has been inducted into the Hall of Fame for both sports.  After retiring from sport he became a film actor.

3.

This athlete won a silver medal in the Quadruple Sculls at the 2004 Olympics and a gold medal in the cycling individual pursuit at the 2012 Olympics.

4.

This athlete won gold medals in the athletics 400m Sprint and the cycling 500m Time Trial at the 2016 Paralympics.

5.

This Gloucestershire cricketer played 6 tests for England, scoring a century on his debut in 1958.  He also played football for Arsenal and Bristol City, winning his only England cap in 1951.  After retiring from sport, he became a postman .

6.

This cricketer captained South Africa for whom he played 19 tests between 1951 and 1958.  While a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University he won 4 caps for England at rugby.  After retiring from sport he became an MP for the United Party and was one of the founders of the Progressive Party. 

7.

After representing Slovenia in ski-jumping, this athlete turned to professional cycling and won the 2018 Tour of Britain and represented Slovenia in the 2018 World Road Race Championship.

8.

A Formula One driver for Lotus in the 1990s, he lost both legs in a crash in 2001.  He as since won gold medals for handcycling in both the 2012 and 2016 Paralympics.

Sp

This sportsperson won a gold medal for athletics at the 1924 Paris Olympics and also won 7 caps for Scotland at rugby.  He then served as a Christian missionary in China

Go to Round 4 questions with answers

ROUND 5 - WithQuiz style - 'Triplets'

Each answer is a single word that links all three entities defined in the question

1.

An African country.

A Cunard liner.

A locomotive number D211 in the British Rail Class 40.

2.

The only horse to have won both the Grand National and Cheltenham Gold Cup in the same year.

An American playwright.

A 1990 film directed by the Coen brothers starring Gabriel Byrne.

3.

The actor who plays the eponymous hero in a BBC series.

An English painter.

A Canadian rock band that had a series of hits in the 1970s.

4.

The winner of the Men’s 2018 World Modern Pentathlon Championship.

A 1989 film by Peter Greenaway.

A 1965 book by Len Deighton.

5.

John Brown’s Raid in 1859.

A 1968 single by Jeannie C Riley.

The character played by Daragh O'Malley in the TV series Sharpe.

6.

The main storey of a large house, usually on the first floor, containing the principal apartments.

An Italian architect.

A 1993 film written and directed by Jane Campion.

7.

An American author.

The character played by Lee Strasberg in the film Godfather Part II.

The alter ego of the Marvel comics character.

8.

A winery in the Margaux appellation d'origine contrôlée of the Bordeaux region of France.

An American golfer.

A career criminal, murdered in June 2015, who was known as Goldfinger for his part in laundering the proceeds of the Brinks-Mat robbery by melting down the gold in his garden.

Sp

Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, a leader in the early stages of the French Revolution.

Two corners on the Monaco Grand Prix circuit.

A bridge over the River Seine in Paris.

Go to Round 5 questions with answers

ROUND 6 - WithQuiz style - 'Homophones'

Each question or answer contains one of 4 homophones

1.

Two novels with the word 'sea' in their title have won the Booker prize.  Name both of the authors.

2.

What is the inscription on the dedication placed by his son next to the tomb of Sir Christopher Wren in St Paul’s Cathedral?  It is also the title of the third album by the black metal band Deathspell Omega.

3.

The cathedral of which see of the Church of England has an octagonal lantern tower?

4.

What song, originally recorded by Ma Rainey in 1924 has also been recorded by (among others) Elvis Presley, Peggy Lee, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, The Animals and Cher?

5.

Which Austrian composer’s 1st, 2nd & 8th symphonies are in the key of C minor?  He was born in Linz in 1824.

6.

Which ancient Greek author wrote the Anabasis, the story of a Greek mercenary army which marched across Persia?  When they reached the Black Sea they cried out in exultation "Thalatta, Thallatta" ("The Sea, The Sea").

7.

See Emily Play was the second single released by Pink Floyd in 1967.  What was the 'A' side of their first single, also released in 1967, called?

8.

Which novel by Jean Rhys tells the story of Jane Eyre's “madwoman in the attic”, Bertha Rochester?

Sp

In the equation E = mc2 what does 'c' stand for?

Go to Round 6 questions with answers

Tiebreakers

1.

What was the number of cars produced in the UK in 2016 to the nearest thousand? 

2.

What was the total attendance for home games in the Premiership for the Sale Sharks in the 2017-2018 season?

Go to Tiebreaker questions with answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 1 - Stockport style - Verbal

1.

Ahmed Sékou Touré was the first President of which African country when it gained its independence in 1958?

(Republic of) Guinea

2.

Who was the architect of the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, which is popularly known as 'Paddy’s Wigwam'?

(Sir Frederick) Gibberd

3.

The name of which element (atomic number 48) derives its name from the founder of the city of Thebes in Greek mythology?

Cadmium

4.

In 1978 Dan White shot and killed George Moscone, the Mayor of San Francisco, and which member of the Board of Supervisors?

(Harvey) Milk

5.

Who played the black detective John Shaft in the 1971 film Shaft?

(Richard) Roundtree

6.

In Italian cuisine what are arancini?

(Deep-fried)

Rice balls/cones

(while they are round in the rest of Italy they are conical in Messina)

7.

The Rugby Union Championship club Cornish Pirates adopted that name in 2005 – what was the former name of the club?

Penzance & Newlyn RFC

8.

Bjarne Soustrop created and developed which widely used computer programming language?

C++

(C by itself is not an acceptable answer as that is a different language)

9.

Who designed the statue of Emmeline Pankhurst which will be placed in St Peter’s Square on 14th December?

(Hazel) Reeves

10.

Marty Balin, Paul Kantner and Jorma Kaukonen were among the original members of which group?

Jefferson Airplane

11.

Which newspaper ceased publication in 1964 and was relaunched as The Sun?

Daily Herald

12.

The National Trust properties Kingston Lacy and Max Gate are located in which county?

Dorset

13.

The classical musicians Stephen Isserlis, Paul Tortelier and Yo Yo Ma are associated with which instrument?

Cello

14.

Who wrote the books Laidlaw and The Papers of Tony Veitch set in Glasgow in the 1970s – he is regarded as the 'Father of Tartan Noir'?

(William) McIlvanney

15.

The battles of Agrigentum (in 262BC) and Lake Trasimene (in 217BC) were battles in which wars?

Punic Wars

16.

Léopold Sédar Senghor was the first President of which African country when it gained its independence in 1960?

(Republic of) Senegal

17.

James Gosling, Mike Sheridan and Patrick Naughton created which widely used computer programming language?

Java

18.

Who is the designer of the Peterloo Memorial which will be placed outside the Manchester Central Convention Centre next year to mark the 200th anniversary of the massacre?

(Jeremy) Deller

19.

What was the pen name of Christopher Murray Grieve, Scottish poet, journalist, essayist and political figure, best known for his works written in 'synthetic Scots', a literary version of the Scots language?

(Hugh) McDiarmid

20.

Which newspaper was closed in 1971 and merged with the Daily Mail?

Daily Sketch

21.

In Italian cuisine if a dish contains the word 'spiedini' how is it cooked?

On a skewer

22.

The classical musicians Victoria Mullova, Jascha Heifetz and David Oistrakh are associated with which instrument?

Violin

23.

Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir and Phil Lesh were among the original members of which group?

The Grateful Dead

24.

The Rugby Union Championship club now known as Yorkshire Carnegie came in to existence in 1991 as Leeds RFC following the merger of which two clubs?

Headingly & Roundhay

25.

Baddsley Clinton & Packwood House are National Trust properties in which county?

Warwickshire

26.

Who played the detective John Klute in the 1971 film Klute?

Donald Sutherland

27.

Who was Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988 and is currently the senior Senator from California?

(Dianne) Feinstein

28.

Which element (atomic number 41) derives it name from the daughter of Tantalus in Greek Mythology?

Niobium

29.

Who was the architect of the rebuilt Coventry Cathedral which was completed in 1962?

(Sir Basil) Spence

30.

The Battle of Aegospotami in 405 BC was the last major battle in which war?

Peloponnesian War

Sp.

What is the name of the BBC channel that broadcasts mainly in Gaelic?

Alba

Go back to Round 1 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 2 - Stockport style - Written - Hidden theme

1.

What was the name of the Essex village used in a commercial for Republican candidate Dr Nick Stella in the 2018 mid-term elections to show the danger of not voting for Donald Trump?

Jaywick

2.

Which 1990s TV series had characters called Dale Cooper, Harry S Truman, Audrey Horne and Leland Palmer?

Twin Peaks

3.

Who wrote the poem which contains the lines "The tumult and the shouting dies; The Captains and the Kings depart"?

(Rudyard) Kipling

(the poem is called Recessional)

4.

What is the name of the largest dock on Merseyside?

(Royal) Seaforth (Dock)

5.

To what genus do the kingfishers belong?

Halcyon

6.

Who is the lead singer of the band Hawkwind and the only original member left? 

(Dave) Brock

7.

Who was called, by Homer, the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs"?

Chiron

8.

Who was the Transport Minister and MP for Wallasey, who oversaw the introduction of parking meters and the provisional driving licence in 1958, and panda crossings in 1962?  He fled to Monaco in 1975 to avoid a substantial tax bill.  He is buried in Southern Cemetery, Manchester.

(Ernest Lord) Marples

9.

Which book by Jung Chang won the NCR Book Prize in 1992?  Its sub-title is Three Daughters of China.

Wild Swans

10.

What is the capital of the Indian state of Rajasthan?

Jaipur

Sp.

What is the name of a series of routes in the Longstone Edge in the Peak District National Park suitable for horse-riding and mountain-biking?  It takes its name from an 18th century highwayman who was hanged on the Gallows Tree at Wardlow Mires.

Black Harry (Trails)

Theme: Beers brewed by the incomparable Thornbridge Brewery in Bakewell

Go back to Round 2 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 3 - WithQuiz style - Hidden theme

1.

The tune Gresford is more commonly known as what?

(The) Miner’s Hymn

2.

The tune Crimond is usually used for setting the words of what?

Psalm 23

(The Lord is My Shepherd)

3.

What was the title of Manhattan Transfer’s only UK Singles Chart No 1 hit in 1977?

Chanson d’Amour

4.

What was the title of Steely Dan’s fourth studio album released in 1975?

Katy Lied

5.

Who is the landlady of 28 Barbary Lane in Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City novels?

(Mrs Anna) Madrigal

6.

What is the title of Walter J Miller Jr’s novel, first published in 1959, which is set in a Catholic monastery in the desert of the south western United States after a devastating nuclear war?  It won the Hugo for Best Science Fiction novel in 1961.

 A Canticle for Leibowitz

7.

What word links a Marvel comics supervillain, a Greek nymph, and Lord Kitchener?

Calypso

8.

Which John Keats poem starts with the words “Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of silence and slow time”?

Ode to a Grecian Urn

Sp

Who was King of Romania at the outbreak of World War I?  (name and regnal number required)

Carol I

Theme: Each answer contain a word which is a synonym for 'song' according to Chambers Thesaurus

Go back to Round 3 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 4 - WithQuiz style - Identify these Sporting Duallists

1.

Winner of the 1912 Olympic decathlon and pentathlon gold medals, he was later (in 1913) stripped of the titles for having played semi-professional baseball in 1909 and 1910.  He went on to play baseball for the New York Giants and American football in the NFL between 1920 and 1928

(Jim) Thorpe

2.

At Syracuse University he was an All-American at lacrosse.  He the played in the NFL for the Cleveland Browns between 1957 and 1965.  He has been inducted into the Hall of Fame for both sports.  After retiring from sport he became a film actor.

(Jim) Brown

3.

This athlete won a silver medal in the Quadruple Sculls at the 2004 Olympics and a gold medal in the cycling individual pursuit at the 2012 Olympics.

(Rebecca) Romero

4.

This athlete won gold medals in the athletics 400m Sprint and the cycling 500m Time Trial at the 2016 Paralympics.

(Kadeena) Cox

5.

This Gloucestershire cricketer played 6 tests for England, scoring a century on his debut in 1958.  He also played football for Arsenal and Bristol City, winning his only England cap in 1951.  After retiring from sport, he became a postman .

(Arthur) Milton

6.

This cricketer captained South Africa for whom he played 19 tests between 1951 and 1958.  While a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University he won 4 caps for England at rugby.  After retiring from sport he became an MP for the United Party and was one of the founders of the Progressive Party. 

(Clive van) Ryneveld.

7.

After representing Slovenia in ski-jumping, this athlete turned to professional cycling and won the 2018 Tour of Britain and represented Slovenia in the 2018 World Road Race Championship.

(Primoz) Roglich

8.

A Formula One driver for Lotus in the 1990s, he lost both legs in a crash in 2001.  He as since won gold medals for handcycling in both the 2012 and 2016 Paralympics.

(Alessandro/Alex) Zanardi

Sp

This sportsperson won a gold medal for athletics at the 1924 Paris Olympics and also won 7 caps for Scotland at rugby.  He then served as a Christian missionary in China

(Eric) Liddell

Go back to Round 4 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 5 - WithQuiz style - 'Triplets'

Each answer is a single word that links all three entities defined in the question

1.

An African country.

A Cunard liner.

A locomotive number D211 in the British Rail Class 40.

Mauretania

2.

The only horse to have won both the Grand National and Cheltenham Gold Cup in the same year.

An American playwright.

A 1990 film directed by the Coen brothers starring Gabriel Byrne.

Miller

Golden, Arthur, Miller’s Crossing

3.

The actor who plays the eponymous hero in a BBC series.

An English painter.

A Canadian rock band that had a series of hits in the 1970s.

Turner

Aidan (Poldark), J M W Turner, Bachmann Turner Overdrive

4.

The winner of the Men’s 2018 World Modern Pentathlon Championship.

A 1989 film by Peter Greenaway.

A 1965 book by Len Deighton.

Cook

James Cooke, The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, Len Deighton’s Action Cook Book

5.

John Brown’s Raid in 1859.

A 1968 single by Jeannie C Riley.

The character played by Daragh O'Malley in the TV series Sharpe.

Harper

Harper’s Ferry, Harper Valley PTA, Patrick Harper

6.

The main storey of a large house, usually on the first floor, containing the principal apartments.

An Italian architect.

A 1993 film written and directed by Jane Campion.

Piano

piano nobile, Renzo Piano, The Piano

7.

An American author.

The character played by Lee Strasberg in the film Godfather Part II.

The alter ego of the Marvel comics character.

Paragon

Roth Philip, Hyman, Copper

8.

A winery in the Margaux appellation d'origine contrôlée of the Bordeaux region of France.

An American golfer.

A career criminal, murdered in June 2015, who was known as Goldfinger for his part in laundering the proceeds of the Brinks-Mat robbery by melting down the gold in his garden.

Palmer

Chateau Palmer, Arnold & John (no relation)

Sp

Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, a leader in the early stages of the French Revolution.

Two corners on the Monaco Grand Prix circuit.

A bridge over the River Seine in Paris.

Mirabeau

Comte de, Mirabeau Bas & Haute, Le Pont

Go back to Round 5 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ROUND 6 - WithQuiz style - 'Homophones'

Each question or answer contains one of 4 homophones

1.

Two novels with the word 'sea' in their title have won the Booker prize.  Name both of the authors.

(Iris) Murdoch, (John) Banville

2.

What is the inscription on the dedication placed by his son next to the tomb of Sir Christopher Wren in St Paul’s Cathedral?  It is also the title of the third album by the black metal band Deathspell Omega.

(Lector) Si monumentum requiris, circumspice

3.

The cathedral of which see of the Church of England has an octagonal lantern tower?

Ely

4.

What song, originally recorded by Ma Rainey in 1924 has also been recorded by (among others) Elvis Presley, Peggy Lee, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, The Animals and Cher?

C C Rider or See See Rider

5.

Which Austrian composer’s 1st, 2nd & 8th symphonies are in the key of C minor?  He was born in Linz in 1824.

(Anton) Bruckner

6.

Which ancient Greek author wrote the Anabasis, the story of a Greek mercenary army which marched across Persia?  When they reached the Black Sea they cried out in exultation "Thalatta, Thallatta" ("The Sea, The Sea").

Xenophon

7.

See Emily Play was the second single released by Pink Floyd in 1967.  What was the 'A' side of their first single, also released in 1967, called?

Arnold Layne

8.

Which novel by Jean Rhys tells the story of Jane Eyre's “madwoman in the attic”, Bertha Rochester?

The Wide Sargasso Sea

Sp

In the equation E = mc2 what does 'c' stand for?

The speed of light

The homophones used are: C, Si, Sea and See

Go back to Round 6 questions without answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tiebreakers

1.

What was the number of cars produced in the UK in 2016 to the nearest thousand? 

1,722,000

2.

What was the total attendance for home games in the Premiership for the Sale Sharks in the 2017-2018 season?

69,015

Go back to Tiebreaker questions without answers